Road Safety Assessment in Olneyville Square

07

Aug

Road Safety Assessment in Olneyville Square

Olneyville

On April 2nd and 3rd 2015, a Pedestrian and Bicycle Roadway Safety Assessment (RSA) was performed by engineering firm VHB in conjunction with a multidisciplinary team comprised of safety, traffic, and highway engineers, local enforcement, and local community organizations. The objective of the RSA was to identify issues and potential near and longer term solutions focusing on pedestrian and bicycle safety. Below are the recommendations VHB put forward based on the assessment.

Immediately (within the next 6 months)

  • Pedestrian – Provide signing and striping enhancements, coupled with an educational campaign and additional enforcement, to encourage use of crosswalks and push buttons. Review the pedestrian signal wiring and equipment so they are working properly.
  • Bicycles – Improve area signage and pavement striping related to bicycle use and partner with community groups to develop a plan to raise safety awareness for bicyclists.
  • Autos – Implement signal retiming and restriping to improve capacity and progression throughout the corridor.
  • Transit – Restripe to provide bus pull-offs/lanes.

In the Near Term (between 6 months and 2 years)

  • Pedestrians – Provide minor infrastructure improvements and pedestrian crossing technologies to better define pedestrian crossings for both pedestrians and vehicles.
  • Bicycles – Provide on-street bicycle facilities within Olneyville Square including connections to the Broadway bike lanes, East Coast Greenway, and Woonasquatucket River Greenway.
  • Autos – Provide minor infrastructure improvements to improve capacity and progression throughout the corridor.
  • Transit – Implement modifications to transit facilities to match up with pedestrian activity.

In the Long Term (beyond 2 years)

  • Pedestrians – Provide transportation options for vehicles to travel through and around the square, offering an opportunity to incorporate “complete streets” to benefit the diversity of users including bicycles, pedestrians, motorists, and transit riders.
  • Bicycles – Provide off-road bicycle facilities within Olneyville Square including connections to the Broadway bike lanes, East Coast Greenway, and Woonasquatucket River Greenway.
  • Autos – Provide transportation options for vehicles to travel through and around the square through enhanced circulation within the corridor for local traffic as well as offering additional freeway connections for transient vehicle to by-pass the square.
  • Transit – Consider providing separated right-of ways or technologies to allow transit to by-pass congestion in the square.

5 thoughts on - Road Safety Assessment in Olneyville Square

  • iheartrhody
    Aug 10, 2015 at 10:04 am

    A pedestrian crossing-only timer on the Westminster/Manton intersection, a bike lane at the intersection, signs about bike safety (no bikes on the sidewalks/share the road) would make a huge difference, to start.

    Crossing at the light at that corner is very dangerous. There's no pause to allow pedestrians to cross while traffic is not moving.

    At least twice a day I have to move to accommodate a bicycle on the sidewalk at the Olneyville Square bus stops, and I'm only there a few minutes a day. The street needs to be made safe for bicyclists so the sidewalks will be safe for pedestrians. Bike safety/traffic sharing classes would not go amiss.

    • MattMoritz
      Aug 14, 2015 at 8:17 am

      All of the above, and reduce the traffic through the area. 50% would probably be enough. At that point,planners/engineers might seriously consider removing one of the 3 lanes from Westminster to Manton to make room for a bike lane on either side (without removing parking!).

      From the pre-analysis report, most of the pedestrian involved crashes were mid-block crossings near the bus stops in the square.

      • iheartrhody
        Aug 14, 2015 at 8:44 am

        It's unsurprising that pedestrian crashes occur there. It's a hub for the northwest side. I personally cross there 5 days a week on my way home from work. There is a crosswalk that's probably misplaced, as most bus riders who cross the street do so behind the bus. It's also largely ignored by drivers. A "Pedestrian Crossing" flashing yellow light would probably help, at least until the novelty wears off.

        I imagine a lot of people who might cross at the corner use the mid-block crosswalk because the corner is so treacherous.

  • MattMoritz
    Aug 11, 2015 at 3:02 pm

    Is there a publicly accessible full version of the document available?

  • James Kennedy
    Aug 13, 2015 at 6:28 am

    I would like to see the full version still.

    I object to beg buttons,and to timing lights to increase car throughput. I can't comment specifically on how much emphasis is given to real, protected bike lanes (the sort that would be helpful in such a busy area) but getting the full report up would be helpful to that end. I don't consider better painted pull-out areas for buses to be a particularly transit-rider-oriented change to bus technology. It's mostly about getting the buses out of the way so that more cars can come through the square.
    http://transportprovidence.blogspot.com/2015/08/o