Rhody Bike Path Passport

12

Aug

Rhody Bike Path Passport

The Zeta II class of Leadership Rhode Island choose to use the RI bike paths as their community service project.  They have organized the Rhode Bike Path Passport to

increase residents’ appreciation of our state by encouraging people to explore Rhode Island’s natural beauty, to stay fit, and to support local businesses.

Participants are asked to visit participating businesses to get a stamp on their passport.

If you collect stamps from three different paths by October 15, 2010, you will be eligible for a prize drawing including a grand prize worth at least $250 – check this website later for prize details!

Looking for a little extra encouragement to get out on the state’s bike paths, perhaps this is just what you’ve been waiting for!

5 thoughts on - Rhody Bike Path Passport

  • Aug 12, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    Seems like participation has been pretty decent, at least based on the stamps we've given out here in Lincoln and the number of stamps riders have gathered from rides on the other bike paths. Completely anecdotal of course, but we've been happy to see so many people participating.

  • Bruce
    Aug 13, 2010 at 12:17 pm

    I'm glad to hear this is getting some use. The projo piece didn't make a lot of sense and I didn't really get what the point was.

  • Labann
    Aug 17, 2010 at 7:38 am

    Hmm… presupposes that you'll motor between, doesn't it?

    Well, here's a cheat. Do them ALL in ONE DAY by bike following this efficient map less than 50 miles. Note: You can't tweak Google maps do what you exactly what you want, so it's just approximate. I'd actually use Glenbridge to get to buttonhole, then trace it back to Glenbridge and take Orteleva to Gallieo to Mt Pleasant on track to Branch, where I'd cut corner by church to Ledge then Smithfield Avenue saving a bunch of uphills. But Google maps snaps to hillier routes you don't necessarily want to take. It's like they are pushing bicyclists off usable roads to favor motorists.

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&am

  • Labann
    Aug 30, 2010 at 8:02 pm

    Made a stab at finishing entire task in one day only to find that many of the participating businesses aren't open on Mondays. Call ahead the day before and plan accordingly.

  • Labann
    Sep 1, 2010 at 10:55 am

    The Daily Scoop and Fruity Cow aren't open mornings, but otherwise completed the mission yesterday. I have all stamps including bonus of Mackal Field House, although I visited South County Trail earlier, as well as Quonset Bike Path. Took 50 miles of hot riding (panting and rolling mostly), but managed to touch on EBBP, Warren Bike Path, Ten Mile River Bikeway, Blackstone Bikeway, Woonasquatucket Northwest Trail, Olneyville, and Washington Secondary. Must have frightened girls at Cosi Bell Salon with my disheveled appearance before turning for home.

    This was the flattest half century I've ever rode. The only steep hills run along Ralco Way in Attleboro and off Carrington in Lincoln down to Blackstone Valley Outfitters, but both are only 1 block long. Varied it slightly in spots to take in interesting rest points. Was surprised when I turned off Ortoleva to Manton to find a nice new entrance to NW Trail ("parallel", in twisty fashion, to Glenbridge) since I seldom use the stretch from the Buttonhole Spur to Merino Park Overpass. Note the "Fight the Power" artwork. Kuods, Providence (which I too seldom get a chance to say). No, I generally get off at Greenville and Manton and take side streets to Buttonhole Spur, then Glenbridge and Pettys, since I'm headed on a bee line to Silver Lake.

    According to the brochure, everyone who completes gets a small prize, not that it matters. The look on the faces and questions of proprietors of these establishments after you tell them you did it all in a day is reward enough. And it wouldn't hurt to make a purchase or take a liquid lunch of coffee shake at Lincoln Creamery. They didn't blink when I asked them to fill my water bottle again. Stay hydrated.

    "Mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the mid-day sun."–Rudyard Kipling