bike issues and the race for Mayor

09

Apr

bike issues and the race for Mayor

Has anyone heard of any bicycle-related issue discussed in the Providence Mayor’s campaign? I have not, nor have even heard anything about any transportation issue, not even pothole problems or what to do with Mayor Ciccilline’s Metro Area Transit study that called for significant improvements in the area’s public transportation system, even a streetcar line. But I have heard nothing about any of this on blogs, at the Uncaucus event, or in the papers. For example the March 18 Providence American gave a whole page to candidate statements, and none of those responding (Tavares, Lombardi, Costantino) made any mention of any transportation issue.

But maybe I just missed it.

With potholes, street sweeping, share-the-road signing, traffic enforcement, commuter incentives, train station conditions, redesign of the old I-195 corridor, and bike parking being some of the issues of possible interest to the bike community, should we be making an effort to put such issues on the campaign radar? If so, how?

2 thoughts on - bike issues and the race for Mayor

  • MattM
    Apr 12, 2010 at 7:26 am

    If we want it in the public eye, we'll have to participate to get it raised, though I'm surprised that the Uncaucus didn't tackle it. Some nicely time Op/Eds? something like the letter that the NBW did a number of years ago that you shared with me? Get our issues into the Uncaucus?

  • Labann
    Apr 14, 2010 at 8:06 pm

    To repeat, mayoral candidate Constantino told me when we met, “I will order a clearinghouse of digital information on roadnet, where people can report potholes using cell phones, and DPW will immediately schedule repairs.” Sounds good, but why not just ride around city on a grid and constantly fix? Can’t trust city workers?

    I surveyed all the grates (456) on the Providence Plan in only 2 days by bike for defunct Groundworks. Can't see why they can't hire someone part time at minimum wage to inspect streets regularly and report on potholes. No city is that broke. The answer? They just don't want to know. It's chronic; potholes repeat where underlying problems aren’t addressed.