Tags : community

18

Dec

The post below first appeared on the Bike Newport blog. Source –  Bikes + Coffee = LOVE!

17

Dec

Welcome Allyson McCalla!

Welcome Allyson McCalla! Allyson is our new Office and Outreach Manager and we’re so excited to have her on board. She comes to us with a wealth of experience in office management, outreach, events, organizing and fundraising. Come in and say ‘Hi’, and join us in welcoming her to the Bike Newport family. The post Welcome Allyson McCalla! appeared first on Bike Newport.

12

Dec

Meet Matthias and Newport’s Bike Hub

The kids of Newport have been telling us for a long time that they need a place to be kids. Somewhere they can ride, play and learn. A place they can call theirs.  Imagine this: all the buzz and excitement as kids gather for play time and spring/summer camps at the Big Blue Bike Barn. Here they’ve learned bike care and road safety skills. Many have restored a bike of their own. They’re riding freshly cleared trails in Miantonomi Park all the way to the tower, and they’re looking out over their hometown. Work is underway at the Big Blue Bike Barn to make this dream real. We’re outfitting the interiors of two big shipping containers with bike racks and shelving. Metalworkers are preparing to cut doors into the sides. Students from Roger Williams University School of Architecture are designing the awnings and work areas. All donations will be doubled – Donate today! “It’s going to be fun to ride around with other kids at the Big Blue Bike Barn. Everyone will go because they’ll learn so much and be off the roads and in the woods instead. For kids, learning to work on their own bikes and seeing the progress they’re making – riding and having a place to go and work on bikes – is so great. The Bike Barn will be so cool”   – Matthias Wildes, 16. East Bay Met School intern. Traffic-free, safe and healthy places for young people to learn and grow are essential – help us make it happen! Visit our website for more stories from our Bike Newport family. Together, we’re making progress. All donations will be doubled – Donate today! The post Meet Matthias and Newport’s Bike Hub appeared first on Bike Newport.

10

Dec

Pell School Santa’s Bike Giveaway

All year round, people bring outgrown and otherwise unused bikes to Bike Newport’s community bike project – where they receive a little TLC and find their way to new owners. Bikes are restored and made road-ready by volunteers and by folks who earn the bikes through volunteering. Among the beach cruisers, road racers, and city bikes for grown-ups are dozens of bikes for tikes. With an extra happy holiday push, Bike Newport volunteers cleaned and tightened up 46 sets of wheels over the last few weeks and delivered the bikes to the Pell School to join Santa’s other surprises at a community toy distribution on Saturday, December 8th. Bike bows and shiny chrome brought smiles to lots of little ones who also left with helmets and “Roll Model” lessons on safe cycling. The post Pell School Santa’s Bike Giveaway appeared first on Bike Newport.

12

Oct

Annual Tour de Fright 2018

The post below first appeared on the Bike Newport blog. Original source: Annual Tour de Fright 2018

12

Oct

The survey results are in!

The post below first appeared on the Bike Newport blog. View post:  The survey results are in!

21

Sep

The following notes were shared by Bike Newport to RI Department of Transportation as part of the community review process. These notes reflect input discussed and gathered at numerous community reviews, including Newport Health Equity Zone, North End Neighborhood Association, Bike Newport Board of Directors, Newport Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Commission, and other Bike Newport community gatherings. The following notes should be taken into consideration as we continue to improve/refine the plan for the ramp realignment and surrounding areas within the project limits. PLANNING FOR BICYCLES AND PEDESTRIANS: The plan needs to address motorized traffic, bicycles, and pedestrians together from the first stages of design. Bicycle and pedestrian accommodation are referenced as primary but are not reflected in the designs. The designs represent motor traffic and promise bike and pedestrian accommodation later. It shouldn’t be assumed that the location of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure will be added on or even adjacent to the road. We should consider the entire project area to determine what spaces will accommodate all modes safely and comfortably. Additionally, the connections to city sidewalks, parks, and paths just beyond the project limits should be addressed to ensure connectivity. Please have a look at this workshop report[1] from Lynn, Massachusetts. This level of consideration should inform the roadway design. Some of the most relevant pages address: households with no car; pedestrian and bicycle facilities and facility designs; and what facilities might work in their project area. We do not have to hold for the design stage to introduce the facilities that the project managers are already considering. Now is the time. Traffic volume reports are vital to understanding the recommendations, but the reports provided are difficult to interpret and lack context. When were the traffic volumes recorded? What day of the week, and what season of year? We want to make our plans in the best interest of resident livability when we are adjacent to residential areas. Along with traffic volume, we need to consider existing levels of comfort for bicyclists and pedestrians, along with projected demand based on points of interest. The studies should be addressing all road users, their safety, flow, destinations, and improved accommodation from the outset. Additionally, the final plan has to recognize the important corridors and intersections outside and adjacent to the project area. The plan should advance the goals of the Newport Comprehensive Land Use Plan and the Open Space Plan. These alignments with these City plans should be sought, noted, and shared.   The plan should be made with intentional attention to the long-term future – thinking 30, 40, 50 years out – considering known and projected weather, transportation modes, traffic patterns, and development. Gather a Project Advisory Board to continue to represent/oversee as plans move forward – and to keep it moving forward. Nothing need delay or derail the project. This Advisory Group can assist with assembling the list of recommendations according to existing plans – STIP, LRTP, Bike Mobility Plan, Open Space Plan, Comprehensive Land Use Plan. Solicit information from other entities with relevant plans in the vicinity. This recommendation goes beyond listening sessions, it is the active collecting and consideration of planning that is relevant in terms of location, traffic flow, pedestrian and bicycle activity, residential and commercial development and more, and includes these offices/agencies and more: Newport Office of Civic Investment, RIPTA, the Navy, City of Newport Public Services (re other road projects), Bike Newport, City Parks, Aquidneck Land Trust, Newport HEZ, RK Properties, Carpionato Group, Discover Newport, Newport & Narragansett Bay Railroad, Newport Housing Authority, Trinity Management, and others. This project is our opportunity to demonstrate innovative creative contemporary planning and forward thinking – let’s make it the best it can be and a model for the island, the state, the region!   SPECIFIC DESIGN ELEMENTS Roundabouts, side paths, and other infrastructure elements that support vulnerable road users can now be based on contemporary best practice facilities in place in other cities, as in the workshop report from Lynn Massachusetts referenced above. A road trip by the project managers, consultants, and primary stakeholders to experience these designs first hand would enhance the expertise to make the best recommendations for our conditions. The 200-space parking lot is not sufficient to accommodate drivers who shift to other transportation modes into the city. By comparison the three parking lots at the Steamship Authority in Falmouth accommodate a total of 5500 cars for people leaving their cars behind headed to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. The design studies should recognize/reference the different mode shifts that are being considered along with some predictions of usage. What modes are in the works? Bike Share, People Movers, City Shuttles. Where is that vision expressed? The road originally planned to run north between Festival Field Apartments and the RK Newport Shopping Center is a potential method for channeling a high volume of outbound traffic out of town efficiently, without using Admiral Kalbfus or the rotary, and bypassing both the Point and the North Side neighborhoods. This option needs to be considered and addressed. Traffic should be diverted away from neighborhoods. High volume traffic should be directed onto Connell Highway and potentially onto the road referenced in (2) above. Plans should include calm and comfortable connections and passages into/ out of the neighborhoods. The intersection of Malbone Road, Girard Avenue, and Admiral Kalbfus Road represents the eastern limit of the project area and requires very focused attention for vulnerable road user passage. This intersection is currently one of the most dangerous in the city while also a site of concentrated vulnerable road user activity. It represents the nexus of neighborhoods, schools, businesses, residences, and Miantonomi Park – and it is also part of the direct connect between the First Mile Bikeway and the North Side neighborhoods. Extend the project area east to West Main Road in order to provide the necessary traffic calming and pedestrian-safe measures along Admiral Kalbfus Road in consideration of the adjacent neighborhoods, residences, park activity, and safe routes to schools. Any rotary must be designed as a modern roundabout with bicycles and pedestrians safely accommodated on a separated outer rim. All bicycle connections on roads of 25mph or higher must be separated/buffered/protected.   The board, staff, and participants of Bike Newport, thank RIDOT for the attention given to community input. We hope these notes are helpful and confirming. We look forward to continued and timely progress on this critical and promising project. [1] Link to: http://lynnbikeped.com/system/images/2446/original/Lynn_Walking_and_Bicycling_Plan_Workshop_1_Presentation.pdf The post Regarding the Pell Bridge Ramp Realignment Designs appeared first on Bike Newport.

11

Sep

The post below first appeared on the Bike Newport blog. Original article –  In need of some good bike karma? Take a quick survey for us.

09

Aug

The Rhode Island Bicycle Coalition (RI Bike) is organizing a Complete Smart Cycling Class via Bike Newport and would love for you to join us. The Complete Smart Cycling Class is a very helpful overview about riding with traffic for everyone – and pre-requisite for Instructor Training. Everyone who attends this class will be better informed about road sharing and basic bicycle to be safer on the roads. We need more people to have this information and to share it with others, in particular by volunteering and helping out with Bike Newport rides and education programs. It will be a one day course on August 26th (possible different date) and it’s free! RI Bike is providing the instructor and all materials. A few details: The Complete Smart Cycling Class is a fast-paced, class that provides cyclists with the confidence to ride safely and legally in traffic or on the trail and how to teach children to ride cautiously and conspicuously while on their own. We will cover the basics of bike maintenance, rules of the road, on-bike skills, and crash avoidance techniques. This class is a prerequisite for becoming a certified League Cycling Instructor from the League of American Bicyclists. It’s broken down into: 1) A classroom session at one time ~ approx 4 hours 2) An on-road session which includes: A ride where the students take turns leading the group and are expected to stop, start, turn right and left, place them selves in the appropriate place in the lanes, etc Parking lot drills: the prescribed 8 avoidance and emergency exercises ~3-4 hours depending on class size. The written test and review with final questions, awarding of certificate takes about 1 hour. If you use the on-line test then this takes about 30 minutes. If you’re interested in this course, please email clare@bikenewportri.org with your interest. The post Complete Smart Cycling Class – Please join us. appeared first on Bike Newport.

24

Nov

Dreaming Bike-Friendly is Easy. Building Bike-Friendly is Hard.

2015 has been a banner year!

Bike Newport continues to gain traction on the roads, in the community, and around the region. Our “By the Numbers” card details exciting progress: more bike education, more bike infrastructure, and more bike riders. That’s the Bike Newport story – MORE and BETTER bicycling.

No matter why you ride, or even if you don’t ride, you’ll love the community we’re working to create. A bike-friendly Newport will also be a kid-, pedestrian-, elder-, business-, and environment-friendly Newport. Newport will be a better community for motorists, as well. We’re working to educate all road users about safety – better bicyclists, better pedestrians, and better motorists.

Our efforts are all based on a three-part promise of more and better infrastructure, education, and ridership:

On the road to this bike-friendly vision, we’re working toward more bike lanes, more bike parking, better bike routes, better bike education, better road sharing, and, yes, dedicated bike paths on Aquidneck Island – starting with the First Mile. We will hold our course until we have connected the North End with the center of town, and we have afforded our residents and visitors a healthful and enjoyable way to arrive in Newport walking and biking. That First Mile of bike path will be one more step on the path to a bikeable and walkable island – for transportation and for recreation. We can do this – with your help. We can hold our course and continue to strengthen our partnerships, deepen our traction, and advance our progress.

Please support us today. Because dreaming bike-friendly is easy. But funding bike-friendly is hard.

Every contribution helps! Donations are tax-deductible.
Contributions over $50 will receive a free Bike Newport 2016 membership.

Join us, visit us, be part of the action.

Take a class, rescue a bike, come for a community ride, share your road knowledge, mark the maps, teach a kid to ride or to keep her tires inflated, help park some of the 3,369 bikes at the Folk Festival! Stop by our HQ at 437 Broadway any time and say hello. Grab a Newport Bike Map and a Commuter Guide while you’re here. Visit our Bike Garages and get a tour of the inventory, learn a little about wheel truing from an expert, or how to fix a flat from a recent basic bike maintenance graduate. Bear witness to the crowd of kids circling Miantonomi Park on Bike Library bikes.

We need your help to make it all happen! To keep us in the saddle and at the tables where decisions are made. We need your help to keep the doors open to our Bike Library, the tools busy at our Bike Garages, the routes shared in our Bike Map, the spotlight on local and statewide Bike Plans, and funding for safer on-road biking as well as multi-use paths.

If you have ideas, questions, feedback, please reach out to us. Our email is info@bikenewportri.org. Our phone number is (401) 619-4900.

Explore this website – it’s chock full of great information, maps, and resources.

THANK YOU! For your support, and for being part of Bike Newport.

Bike Newport Board:

Dawn Euer, Chair; Allison McNally, Vice Chair; Don Jagoe, Treasurer; Laura Murphy, Secretary; Sarah Atkins, Renee Kaminitz, Peter Harty, James Ryan, Chip Young

Bike Newport Staff:

Bari Freeman, Executive Director; Mark Chesterton, Director of Education; Liza Burkin, Program Manager

The post Dreaming Bike-Friendly is Easy. Building Bike-Friendly is Hard. appeared first on Bike Newport.